Why Choose Courtney Material Handling, Inc. for  Pallet Jack Scales?

January 20th, 2020

Why Choose Courtney Material Handling, Inc. for  Pallet Jack Scales?

Fairbanks Scales’ Pallet Weigh pallet jack scale combines the functionality of an extremely rugged pallet jack with the incredible accuracy of a Fairbanks’ scale.
The Pallet Weigh scale is easy to maneuver into space-limited areas. The simple operation keeps work flowing in fast paced environments.
The scale meets, or exceeds, industry standards for accuracy, durability and repeat-ability.

Contact 

Courtney Material Handling, Inc.

574-229-3180 or 224-423-1708

beth@cmhionline.com

www.cmhionline.com

Stainless Rotator Our Rotator in a stainless version (fully powered) for the tilting of crates and boxes, so that the user can reach the contents without stretching, bending and straining the back. It is perfectly suited for dry environments with high hygienic requirements. Turning carriage, screen, battery box, box holders and handle are made of stainless steel. The chassis is cromited. (PFG00428)

January 20th, 2020

Stainless Rotator

Interthor Rotator in a stainless version (fully powered) for the tilting of crates and boxes, so that the user can reach the contents without stretching, bending and straining the back. It is perfectly suited for dry environments with high hygienic requirements. Turning carriage, screen, battery box, box holders and handle are made of stainless steel. The chassis is cromited. (PFG00428)

 

To Learn More – Contact:

Courtney Material Handling, Inc.

574-229-3180 or  224-423-1708

beth@cmhionline.com

www.cmhionline.com

NEW- Electric Powered Rough Terrain Pallet Trucks

January 20th, 2020

INTRODUCING NEW TO CMH

 Electric Powered Rough Terrain Pallet Trucks

 

Contact

Courtney Material Handling, Inc.

574-229-3180 or 224-423-1708

beth@cmhionline.com

www.cmhionline.com

New Jobsite Storage Products!

January 15th, 2020

New Jobsite Storage Products!

 

Jobsite Boxes/Cabinet- All:
• 14 gauge, steel construction
• Recessed handles prevent damage when moving
the product
• Recessed padlock enclosure – padlock not included
• Wire gripping grommet included for feeding wire or electrical
cable for chargers
• Architecture Paint – For outdoor, UV protection. Durable gray,
textured powder coat finish
• All welded, fully assembled, ready to use

Welders box D:
• Padlock-able hasp – padlock not included
• Power supply, knock-out hole on both sides of unit
• Side handles fold down to save space

Jobsite Box E:
• 2 fixed shelves on each end: 18-3/4” W x 3-9/16” D x 2-3/8” H
• Fixed top shelf: 59-13/16” W x 13-1/4” D x 2-9/16” H
• Lower shelf tips up for additional space:
59-1/2” W x 12-1/2” D x 2-5/16” H

Cabinet F:
• 6 fixed door shelves: 25-3/16” W x 3” D x 1-5/8” H
• Left side has 3 shelves: 28-1/2” W x 20-7/16” D with 14-3/16”
shelf clearance. Shelves tip up to accommodate larger items
• Right side has cabinet space: 26” W x 24-7/16” D x 57-1/4” H

For More Information, Contact

Courtney Material Handling, Inc.

574-229-3180 or 224-423-1708

beth@cmhionline.com

www.cmhionline.com

Not All Loading Dock And Loading Dock Equipment Are The Same!

January 13th, 2020

Not All Loading Dock And Loading Dock Equipment Are The Same!

We have collaborated with a well respected loading dock equipment manufacturer with over 75 years of designing, studying and trouble-shooting loading dock applications.  They have seen it all and found solutions for all! We can handle your Truck Dock Bumpers, Trailer Restraints, Loading Dock Lights, Loading Dock Equipment and More.

On almost a daily basis, we are seeing docks with sloped approaches toward the building and pit levelers. No part of the truck should ever be closer than four inches to the wall of the building. Standard pit levelers come with 4.5? bumpers for level driveway approach. There is zero tolerance for any decline or sloped approach toward the building. Backing the truck down toward the building causes the top of the truck to come closer to the building wall than the bottom.

If this is not addressed in the design, the solution can be extremely difficult, expensive, or even impossible depending on the severity of the slope. Replacing the standard 4.5? bumpers with thicker ones would be the most likely solution except that this reduces the amount of leveler lip extending into the truck, creating a safety and liability issue.

The proper solution can be accomplished by designing the dock area of the building with a wall setback or constructing the building with a concrete ledge even with the floor of the building that projects out several inches. Either design provides the needed space between the wall and the approaching vehicle in a decline situation. (see figure 1)

For mild declines of 1% to 3%, it is possible to add bumper projection and, if levelers are involved, use the 20? lip option adding 4? of lip projection to the standard leveler.

 

What Are The Main Factors That Need To Be Considered When Dealing With A Sloped Approach Toward A Loading Dock?

It would be nice if there was an iron clad mathematical formula for determining the percentage or degree of grade and minimum safe bumper projection and taper of dock seals or shelters, but there are too many variables. If we are told that the approach rises “X” inches over “Y” feet, it almost never a constant slope. Rather, there is normally some flat area adjacent to the building (which helps a lot), then the drive can go up, flatten out, and maybe go up some more. This means that different trucks can come in at different angles. It is better to have the bumpers protruding out too far than not far enough.

Some equipment manufacturers refer to degrees of slope and others refer to percent of grade. We prefer to work with percent of grade. It has been our experience that most customers calling in with the slope measured in degrees are feeding us numbers that are too high to be realistic or accurate.

This Is A Chart Comparing Percent Of Grade To Degree Of Grade.

The percentage of grade is determined by dividing the height difference by the ramp length. As previously stated, the top of the truck needs to be at least four inches away from the wall, so the safe bumper projection is the percent of grade converted to inches plus four.

For example: if the ramp rises 2? over 40?, then there is a 5% grade so the recommended safe bumper projection is 9?.

Extra thick laminated dock bumpers are available in various projections up to twelve inches, but the best thing to do is to plan ahead and provide the extra concrete ledge as previously described.

What Is The Ideal Door Opening Size For A Loading Dock?

Again, there is no simple answer to what seems like a simple question.Many factors need to be taken into consideration: (1) whether the customer has a fleet of trucks that are identical or if they are serviced by a range of common carriers, (2) the dock height and range of truck heights, and (3) the type of freight. For example, if the best possible seal was desired, and the trucks were 8? wide and 12’6? high, the dock height was 4?, and full access to the truck opening was not required, the ideal opening size would be 7’6? x 8’6? using a seal. If trucks were 8? or 8’6? wide and full access to the truck opening was required, then the ideal opening size would be 9 x 10 and a rigid shelter would be a better solution. In general, the larger the opening the less efficient the dock will be in terms of energy consumption.

To Be 100% Sure The Dock Will Be Done Correctly, What Do I Need To Know?

The dock height is a critical dimension. Generally, a standard dock height is considered to be around 48?, but several inches more or less is very common. A shorter dock height will raise the top of the truck in relation to the door opening and a deeper dock height will lower it. Forgetting to check the dock height can create problems such as a deep dock height causing the truck to not seal at the top or a shallow dock height causing the truck to hit a standard shelter too high and damage it.

The range of truck widths is another factor that needs to be considered. Most semi trailers are 8?, but many of the newer ones are 8’6?. On the other extreme, some smaller trucks are also used at docks in places such as bakeries, so they could be even less that 8? wide. Also, when smaller trucks are involved, it is common for them to have some sort of step or lift gate that causes the box of the truck that needs sealed to be even further away from the wall. When dealing with step type trucks, the only way to use a foam dock seal is if those are the only trucks being used at the dock. Whenever both step trucks and non step trucks are used at the same dock, a rigid shelter is the way to go.

Another special type of semi trailer is the high cube trailer.
These are full height trailers that have the bottoms low to the ground. They are often used by companies that have low density, light weight products such as mattress or potato chip companies. Often, companies using this type of truck have special short dock heights of 18? to 24?. Other times, they use ramps to raise the floor of the trailer up even with the floor of the building. The use of riser ramps at docks can cause many problems with dock seals and shelters, and the solution to this situation needs to be looked at carefully.

A common problem encountered with loading docks is that sometimes people try to put too many openings in not enough space. Side room and head room is critical for the proper installation and performance of dock seals and shelters. There is nothing worse than convincing the customer that shelters are needed instead of seals and then finding out that there is not enough room for them.

Loading Dock Design Considerations.

Designing the loading dock area of any given building would, at first glance, appear to be a simple task. However, just as other areas and components of a building are critical to its efficient function and use by the occupant, the loading dock must be properly designed for efficient movement of product over the dock.

To achieve a proper dock design, the following items must receive thorough consideration:

  • Truck movement to and from the dock-Can the building be positioned on the available site to meet local codes and also provide safe, efficient access for approaching trucks?
  • Quantity of door openings
  • Grade of truck approach – incline, decline, or level
  • Style of truck – tractor trailer, common carrier, captive fleet, straight truck, step vans, trucks with hydraulic lifts, or package delivery vans
  • Truck restraint devices
  • Number of trucks per door per day
  • Method of loading – pallet jack, fork lift, unitized loads, conveyor, or hand loading
  • Weight, frequency, and speed of forklift
    Whether to use dock seals or shelters
  • Dock height
  • Dock leveler style

Another Very Prevalent Problem Is Over-Compression.

Many consider 12-inch projection seals and 4-inch projection bumpers to be standard. The problem with this is that seals should be compressed 4 inches to 6 inches. This means that the maximum recommended seal is 10 inches for a 4-inch bumper and the minimum recommended bumper is 6-inch for a 12-inch seal. Anything over 6 inches of compression does not create a better seal; rather, it just makes the seal wear out faster.

Many times, the dock seal and shelter cover fabric specifications are predicated on some of the more expensive rubber based products that have been very heavily promoted by dock seal industry leaders. Although these fabrics have a good reputation, from a durability standpoint, the important factor is not whether the coating is rubber or vinyl, but rather whether the base fabric made to last. The base fabric of a material is the interwoven nylon or polyester strands sandwiched between the two layers of rubber or vinyl. The thickness and quality of the strands determine the tear strength of the material. In some cases, these are very commonly specified light duty base fabrics and used in conjunction with expensive rubber coatings. The end result is a product with low durability and high cost. Nearly every manufacturer of loading dock seals and dock shelters has available what is generically known as high tear vinyl. Because durability and longevity is the goal, these fabrics provide the most cost-effective product.

We hope some of the information contained on this page has been helpful, and we invite anyone who has a question regarding loading dock design to give us a call at 574-229-3180 or 224-423-1708.

COURTNEY MATERIAL HANDLING, INC.

574-229-3180 OR 224-423-1708

beth@cmhionline.com

www.cmhionline.com

New Decade – New Spaces

January 6th, 2020
We’re at the start of a new decade, and here at Courtney Material Handling, Inc. and Goff’s, we’re committed to helping you make it the most successful one yet! We’re equipped and ready to help you optimize your next project with our high performance vinyl doors, loading dock fall protection, and flexible curtain walls designed to maximize efficiency and productivity.
Have a specific project in mind? Contact us to discuss.
COURTNEY MATERIAL HANDLING, INC.
574-229-3180 OR 224-423-1708
beth@cmhionline.com
www.cmhionline.com

Get Organized in 2020 With Storage Bins, Shelving, Containers and Carts!

January 5th, 2020

Get Organized in 2020

With

Storage Bins, Shelving, Containers and Carts!

To Learn More Contact:
COURTNEY MATERIAL HANDLING, INC.
(574)229-3180 OR (224)423-1708
beth@cmhionline.com

 

January 5th, 2020

ELECTRIC TUGGERS

REDUCE employee injuries from strain and fatigue
SAFELY transport materials across various surfaces and inclines
IMPROVE your ergonomic footprint
BOOST employee morale and productivity
INCREASE your bottom line profitability

To Learn More Contact:

COURTNEY MATERIAL HANDLING, INC.

(574)229-3180 OR (224)423-1708

beth@cmhionline.com

Motorized Cylinder Carts

January 5th, 2020

When the job calls for pushing, pulling, and turning a heavy load, an investment in a motorized cylinder cart gives you an ergonomic solution for
delivering and transporting industrial and medical gases. With standard payload capacities up to 2,000 pounds, our products help you get the job
done, PRODUCTIVELY and SAFELY.

 

To Learn More Contact:

COURTNEY MATERIAL HANDLING, INC.

(574)229-3180 OR (224)423-1708

beth@cmhionline.com

Introducing our new… All Terrain Dollies

December 30th, 2019
The latest in Courtney Material Handling, Inc. product offerings!
Introducing our new…
All Terrain Dollies
ALL-T-D6W-1000
Model: ALL-T-D6W-1000
ALL-T-D8W-1400
Model: ALL-T-D8W-1400
Adjustable Back Plate
Available in 6-Wheel and 8-Wheel Units
Great for moving heavy loads over rough terrain!
Standard Features:
  • Large 10″ black urethane foam wheels.
  • Available in 6-wheel or 8-wheel units.
  • Yellow adjustable plate fitted to rear of unit.
  • Plate acts as a barrier, but allows for oversized products when down.
  • Front of dolly has an open design to secure any sort of pulling device.
  • Pull/restraint strap included.
  • Tough baked in powder coated black finish.